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Gender Statistics on Labor and Employment: Women’s Employment

Gender Statistics on Labor and Employment: Women’s Employment

Jan 14, 2012

Gender Statistics on Labor and Employment: Women’s Employment As the global crisis worsens, women’s employment and livelihood security are getting hit hard. Women workers in the Export Processing Zones are a case in point. Moreover, according to the ILO Global Employment Trends for Women 2009 Report, “Women are also often in a disadvantaged position in terms of the share of vulnerable employment (i.e. unpaid family workers and own-account workers) in total employment. These workers are most likely to be characterized by insecure employment, low earnings and low productivity.” In the Philippines, of the 12.8 million women recorded as employed in 2006, 4.2 million are own account workers and 2.2 million are unpaid family workers. Most women are employed in wholesale and retail trade, agriculture, manufacturing and private households. The tables below summarize gender employment statistics released in 2008, giving a broad snapshot of women’s employment in the country. With the Philippines’ jobs crisis exacerbated by the global slump, several reports and analyses are expecting conditions to deteriorate, in the formal and informal sectors, as well as the productive and reproductive spheres. Labor Force Participation Rate (LFPR) (in percent)
Year 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004   2005* (January) 2006 2007
LFPR 65.9 66.4 64.9 67.1 67.4 66.7 67.5 66.1 64.2 64
LFPR WOMEN 49.1 50.1 48.5 51.8 52.8 51.4 51.2   49.5 49.3 49.3
LFPR MEN 83.2 82.9 81.4 82.4 82 82.2 83.8 82.8 79.3 78.8
Employment by Industry 2007 (In Thousands)
MEN WOMEN
    All Industries

20,542

13,018

 

 

       Agriculture, Hunting and Forestry

7,437

2,905

       Fishing

1,327

117

       Mining and Quarrying

135

14

       Manufacturing

1,684

1375

       Electricity, Gas and Water Supply

112

23

       Construction

1,742

36

       Wholesale and Retail Trade; Repair of Motor
         Vehicles, Motorcycles and Personal and
         Household Goods

2,526

3828

       Hotels and Restaurants

409

498

       Transport, Storage and Communications

2,428

170

       Financial Intermediation

156

203

       Real Estate, Renting and Business Activities

578

307

       Public Administration and Defense;
        Compulsory Social Security

950

601

       Education

259

776

       Health and Social Work

101

272

       Other Community, Social and Personal
        Service Activities

435

415

       Private Households with Employed Persons

262

1478

       Extra-Territorial Organizations and Bodies

2

1

  Employment by Class of Worker
Year 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002
EMPLOYED PERSONS 32.96 Million 32.3 Million 31.6 Million 30.6 Million 30.1 Million
Wage and   Salary Workers 16.79 Million 16.3 Million 16.47 Million 15.35 Million 14.65 Million
Own-Account Workers 12.13 Million 12.10 Million 11.6 Million 11.5 Million 11.39 Million
Unpaid Family Workers 4.037 Million 3.89 Million 3.5 Million 3.7 Million 4.0 Million
           
EMPLOYED WOMEN 12.8 Million 12.4 Million 11.96 Million 11.76 Million 11.75 Million
Wage and Salary Workers 6.4 Million 6.2 Million 6.1 Million 5.8 Million 5.6 Million
Own-account Workers  4.2 Million 4.04 Million 3.9 Million 3.9 Million 3.9 Million
           Self-Employed 3.84 Million 3.73 Million 3.62 Million 3.61 Million 3.64 Million
           Employer 322,000 316,000 313,000 318,000 324,000
Unpaid Family Workers 2.2 Million 2.17 Million 1.9 Million 2.0 Million 2.15 Million
  Underemployed Women
1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
Number of Underemployed Women 1.769 Million 1.833  Million 1.824 Million 1.455 Million 1.5 Million 1.53 Million 1.617 Million 2.082 Million 2.280 Million 2.058 Million
Women’s Underemployment Rate 17.8 17.5 17.8 13 12.8 13 13.5 16.8 18.1 15.8
Notes: 1. Details may not add up to totals due to rounding 2. Labor force is the sum of all the employed and unemployed persons 3. Labor force participation rate is the ratio of the total labor force to the total household population 15 years old and over multiplied by 100 a *The NSO adopted the new (ILO) definition of unemployment in the LFS questionnaire starting with the April 2005 survey round. As the data for January 2005 were based on the old definition of unemployment, averages for 2005 cannot be computed for the four survey rounds (January, April, July and October). Due to the change in methodology, labor force data series for 2005 and onwards are not comparable with the old. r Revised. Starting with the January 2007 Labor Force Survey Round, the population projection based on the 2000 Census of Population was adopted to generate labor force statistics per NSCB Resolution No. 1 series of 2005. For 2006 data, recalculation of employment indicators was done using the population projections based on the 2000 Census of Population. Thus, starting 2006, LFS data series are not comparable with previous years. SOURCE: 2008 GENDER STATISTICS ON LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT   (Published in: Focus on the Philippines March 2009, http://focusweb.org/oldphilippines/content/view/263/52/)

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